Tie-dye master sets up shop in Englewood

Katie DeGroot sells groovy handmade gear at The Peace Place

David Gilbert
dgilbert@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 9/28/20

Katie DeGroot is ready to help people show their funky side. DeGroot opened The Peace Place, a shop filled with her handmade tie-dye creations, at Quincy Avenue and Broadway in late August. The shop …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution in 2019-2020, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access includes access to all websites and online content.


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Tie-dye master sets up shop in Englewood

Katie DeGroot sells groovy handmade gear at The Peace Place

Posted

Katie DeGroot is ready to help people show their funky side.

DeGroot opened The Peace Place, a shop filled with her handmade tie-dye creations, at Quincy Avenue and Broadway in late August.

The shop has way more than rainbow T-shirts: DeGroot’s shelves and racks are lined with baby clothes, hoodies, hats and tapestries in a mind-melting menagerie of colors and designs. DeGroot also does custom pieces.

“No two pieces are alike,” DeGroot said. “That’s the beauty of tie-dye: Everyone can find the exact piece that speaks to them. Colors communicate a lot about how we feel and how we see ourselves, and I want to help people express that.”

DeGroot herself wasn’t always so expressive. With a mind for math and science, she spent years in the corporate world, in accounting and finance. But cubicle life was stultifying, and the Colorado native wanted to break free.

“I always thought you had to be precise with your creativity,” DeGroot said. “For some reason I had it in my head that if you were going to draw or paint or write, you had to do it with precision.”

Then, she discovered tie-dye, where she found the freedom to let her freak flag fly.

“I can put my love and heart into every piece,” she said. “Plus, it gets me out of my head.”

Still, she finds it a melding of the analytical and the creative: There’s the science of how different dyes will respond to different fabrics, or the geometry that allows for complex designs.

DeGroot began selling her creations at fairs and festivals a couple years ago, but 2020 was supposed to be the start of her grandest adventure. She planned to toss her equipment and her dog in her van and strike out across the country, selling her wares at craft fairs along the way.

Alas, the pandemic had other plans, and DeGroot found herself grounded. But soon she found what would become her shop, an old store built in the early 1920s at 4300 South Broadway.

“It’s a different kind of adventure, but it’s still an adventure,” she said. “It was meant to be.”

DeGroot made space in the shop for other local artisans, who sell everything from rings and jewelry to dried mushrooms. She hopes to build a studio where she can teach her craft to others.

“I want to do more than sell my art,” DeGroot said. “I want to spread goodness and kindness. Come in and say hi.”

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.