Schlachter first to announce candidacy for mayor

Former city councilmember seeks comeback with focus on mobility, housing

David Gilbert
dgilbert@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 6/10/21

Former Littleton city councilmember Kyle Schlachter became the first candidate to officially declare for this fall's mayoral race, which will mark the first time in many years that citizens will …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution in 2020-2021, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access includes access to all websites and online content.


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Schlachter first to announce candidacy for mayor

Former city councilmember seeks comeback with focus on mobility, housing

Posted

Former Littleton city councilmember Kyle Schlachter became the first candidate to officially declare for this fall's mayoral race, which will mark the first time in many years that citizens will directly elect the city's mayor.

Schlachter, 40, served at-large on city council from 2017-2019. He narrowly lost a reelection bid, coming in a close third among five candidates vying for two at-large seats in 2019, behind Pam Grove and Scott Melin.

Voters overwhelmingly approved Ballot Question 3A in 2020, which allows citizens to vote directly for the Littleton's mayor. The mayor's role will not change, however. Mayors will still preside over meetings, but will remain one of seven equal votes on city council.

Schlachter said he has stayed involved in city politics since he left council, and is eager to make a comeback.

“This is a pivotal moment — Littleton is emerging from COVID, and there will be a lot of challenges and opportunities in the next four years,” he said. “We've got to keep the city moving in the right direction, and that means we need to make sure the city can function properly to provide the services citizens expect.”

High on the list is addressing transportation and mobility issues, Schlachter said.

“It's about more than just cars,” he said. “It's about making Littleton safe for wheelchairs and strollers.”

Another big item: housing affordability.

“It's important for governments to do what they can to encourage affordable housing,” he said. “There are give-and-takes to be made on things like density, setbacks and height. We need the political willpower to provide options for people of all income ranges.”

Schlachter also said he is eager to honor Littleton's history and preserve its character.

Schlachter said he is supportive of the concept of a city sales tax increase to bolster the dwindling capital project fund, which could go before voters as soon as this fall.

“The capital projects fund isn't looking so great,” he said. “Projections show it running out by 2025 — it's not a good scenario to be in. I don't know what the current council will propose as far as a tax increase, but I support the idea in theory.”

Schlachter said he was proud of his prior term on council, citing his role in helping draft the city's new comprehensive plan, ratified in 2019. The plan informed the drafting of the Unified Land Use Code, a zoning overhaul scheduled to be ratified this October.

“It's not the end-all of everything, but it's a good starting point,” he said of the comprehensive plan. “I was proud to be part of that process.”

Schlachter also said he's proud of spearheading Littleton's Next Generation Advisory Committee, a board composed of young people who provide feedback on civic affairs to city council.

“They've done well, and I'm proud of that,” he said. “I think city council mentions them more than almost any other board.”

Schlachter has continued to weigh in on city council matters since leaving the dais, including calling for the resignation of councilmember Carol Fey in February after she repeatedly declined to comment on a tax increase proposal.

Schlachter works as a marketing coordinator for the Colorado Department of Agriculture's Wine Industry Development Board. He has a wife and two young children who attend Littleton Public Schools.

He can be reached for questions at kyle4littleton@gmail.com or 720-773-0401. His website is kyle4littleton.com.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.