Ryan Carter was 'miracle' only child

Posted 2/18/19

Ryan Carter's parents called him their “miracle baby.” Ryan's mom Tracy was 35 when he was born, following years of fertility treatments. His due date was Christmas, but he arrived 10 days early. …

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Ryan Carter was 'miracle' only child

Posted

Ryan Carter's parents called him their “miracle baby.”

Ryan's mom Tracy was 35 when he was born, following years of fertility treatments. His due date was Christmas, but he arrived 10 days early.

“He was our Christmas gift,” Tracy said. “The best gift we ever had.”

Ryan, 27, was killed in the early hours of Feb. 6, when a woman allegedly fleeing from police hit his car at Mineral Avenue and Santa Fe Drive in Littleton. Jayne Davicsin, 25, was also killed in the wreck. Davicsin and Carter had recently begun dating.

In their tidy tract home not far from the intersection where he died, Ryan's parents Tracy and Rod sat surrounded by photos of their son — their only child — and recalled the joy he brought them. Beside them sat a wilting purple hyacinth that Ryan had brought home from his job at King Soopers just days before he died.

“He was adored from the moment we knew he existed,” Rod said.

The trio moved to Colorado from Wisconsin in 1996, drawn like so many by Western life. Tracy and Rod shared memories of Ryan's childhood, filled with camping and fishing trips.

Rod, a traveling salesman, loved taking young Ryan on the road with him, to trade shows around the West.

“He was really into the Pokemon card game, and everywhere we went, I'd find a tournament, and Ryan would just show up and beat guys in their 20s and 30s,” Rod said.

In 2002, Tracy said, Ryan made it to an international Pokemon competition in Seattle — but was embarrassed when he finished in second place.

“They gave him this Pokemon backpack, and he wouldn't take it to school,” Tracy said.

Ryan graduated from Heritage High School in 2010, and stayed home as he watched friends go off to college. He started working at King Soopers in 2015, and received quick promotions, and most recently was a produce manager at a store on Colorado Boulevard.

Tracy and Rod remembered their son as quiet, kind and loving.

The last time they spoke, Tracy asked Ryan about his new girlfriend, and asked if she might be “the one.” Ryan was coy and cagey, she said.

Rod and Tracy are still struggling to conceive of what their future will bring.

“There'll be no wedding,” Tracy said. “There'll be no grandkids.”

They're still trying to say goodbye to their miracle baby.

“Ryan was a gift we got to enjoy for a little while,” Tracy said.

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