Party at post office marks stamp of approval

Colorado and national historic registers add building to their rosters

Posted 11/5/19

Littleton’s 70-year-old post office at 5735 S. Prince St. will be celebrated from 1 to 3 p.m. on Nov. 9, and Historic Littleton Inc. is coordinating with the Littleton Post Office staff by inviting …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Party at post office marks stamp of approval

Colorado and national historic registers add building to their rosters

Posted

Littleton’s 70-year-old post office at 5735 S. Prince St. will be celebrated from 1 to 3 p.m. on Nov. 9, and Historic Littleton Inc. is coordinating with the Littleton Post Office staff by inviting the community to join in.

Why? Because the 1939 red brick building has been nominated and accepted for the National Register of Historic Places and the Colorado State Register of Historic Properties — a special honor. Dedication and speakers are scheduled for 2 p.m., tours of the building will be available and refreshments are planned.

Readers may enjoy taking a harder look at this well-used public building that many of us visit frequently for stamps and to mail birthday and holiday gifts, family news and photos — and at times, returned shoes and other online orders that don’t fit properly. It’s so familiar a part of the city of Littleton and our day-to-day lives that we perhaps haven’t paid attention to its details …

Historic Littleton Inc., which celebrates 30 years since the organization’s founding in honor of Littleton’s centennial year founding, recognized that the building is 70 years old and showing some wear … HLI has worked for several years on gaining this recognition for the post office in the “Colonial Revival Style with a side-gable roof and a full basement,” as the application begins: “The Post Office Building, loading docks and parking areas cover half a city block. The building has an `L’-shaped addition added to the west and north sides. The 1962 addition matches the materials and Colonial Revival Style of the original 1939 portion,” wrote HLI President Gail Keeley, a professional historian, who speaks the language of the people at National Park Service who award such special designations when they deem a building worthy ...

The application continues: “The building is located in a prominent location in downtown Littleton on the northwest corner of West Alamo Street and South Prince Street.” (Central to the charming downtown.) “The Post Office faces east on South Prince, with the main entrance on the east side. The original portion has a side gable with copper standing seam roof with simple wood molded cornice with dentils, common bond brick walls and cast stone (cement) water table. A wood cupola is centered on the roofline above the main entrance. All the wood windows are oversized twelve over twelve double-hung with simple cast stone sills and lintels. The 1962 addition has a flat roof with parapet and simple cast stone cornice replicating the original cornice but without dentils. The interior lobby spaces of the original building and the addition are finished using late 1950s modern materials. All the building materials and finishes are original to the two respective building periods, with the exception of a few minor changes in the post office box area.

A narrative follows, mentioning that prominent landmarks in the vicinity include the Littleton Main Street National Historic District, along with the locally listed Main Street Historic District. The other prominent historic building, which is located northwest in the same block, is the Littleton Town Hall, listed in the National Historic Register.

Historic Littleton Inc. board member Rick Cronenberger, a retired National Park Service architect who worked with this national program, has led the effort to have the post office designated — involving frequent paperwork and connections to a variety of individuals who have a say in the matter. He has happily ordered the appropriate bronze plaque, which the local postmaster will mount.

Recognition is in order for this special building — readers are urged to stop by on Saturday, Nov. 9 in the afternoon.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.