Neighbors bring drive-by love to Littleton woman

Friends, well-wishers turn out for Margie Ingram's 95th birthday

David Gilbert
dgilbert@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 6/8/20

Margie Ingram was born to a family of farmers outside a little town in the country. Now, as she turns 95, she lives in a bustling city. The thing is, she never moved. Ingram, who grew up in part in a …

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Neighbors bring drive-by love to Littleton woman

Friends, well-wishers turn out for Margie Ingram's 95th birthday

Posted

Margie Ingram was born to a family of farmers outside a little town in the country. Now, as she turns 95, she lives in a bustling city.

The thing is, she never moved.

Ingram, who grew up in part in a two-story farmhouse that now sits beside the Wynetka Ponds dog park in west Littleton, has seen a lot of changes in her near-century on Earth.

She still lives in Littleton, in the bungalow she built in 1950 with her husband Byford, a Marine veteran who served in the Pacific Theater of World War II. Byford passed away in 2015.

The city may have grown to envelop the little farm town where Ingram was born, but the community still has its heart.

Loved ones, neighbors and well-wishers arrived by the dozen on June 4 for a drive-by birthday party, waving and cheering from festooned cars as Ingram sat on her porch in shock.

“How nice it is to see how much everyone cares about me,” Ingram said.

It was no surprise to Ingram's son Kerry.

“I tell her all the time how loved she is,” Kerry said. “I'm glad now she can see it.”

Among the neighbors who dropped in was Dean Craft, a young man who grew up across the street. He choked up as he recalled mowing the Ingrams' lawn, listening to Byford tell war stories, and chowing down on Margie's homemade cherry pies.

“Thank you for everything,” Craft told Ingram. “Really. You were such an important part of my childhood.”

Neighbors Bill Dolzal and Thomas Gardner dropped by with balloons and a handmade poster taped to their car.

“They're just one of the most wonderful families around,” said Gardner, who fondly recalled the Ingrams' Christmas parties.

Seeing the turnout for Ingram's birthday was a heartwarming event in a troubled time, said her daughter-in-law Mimi.

“In a time where there's a lot of negativity, it's so great to see such joy,” Mimi said.

Asked if she had any advice drawn from her 95 years, Ingram said: “Just be kind.”

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