My Name Is ... Molly Zackary

Punk rocker and mom says society needs places to be strange

Posted 1/5/20

Go west, young punk Music is a huge part of my life — so is motherhood. I teach a lot of singing, and I specialize in early childhood education singing classes. I also have a solo project I write …

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My Name Is ... Molly Zackary

Punk rocker and mom says society needs places to be strange

Posted

Go west, young punk

Music is a huge part of my life — so is motherhood.

I teach a lot of singing, and I specialize in early childhood education singing classes. I also have a solo project I write music for, and a jazz band.

When I was a junior in high school we relocated to Highlands Ranch from Wichita, Kansas. It was a jarring cultural shift, but it was close to a major metropolis. I'd already gotten into punk music by then, and it was thrilling to go to downtown Denver and become part of the scene at house shows and DIY venues.

Before the internet, we used to go to Wax Trax, the old-school record store in Capitol Hill, and pick up fliers for concerts. Often they'd be at some random address downtown. I immediately felt like it was an adopted family that filled in the gaps in my ideological yearning. They were places to disparage economic disparity and environmental collapse, even back in the 1990s.

Gathering places gone

I used to run a record store — it started as a record “distro". I had a bike trailer, and I'd take records around and sell them at punk shows. I used to perform a cabaret show at the Mercury Café.

The Mercury was a vital gathering place. You could be any age and watch bands, listen to some angsty poetry, and eat some food. When you look at other places that creative people and members of subcultures hang out, many are gone now. It's the same in a lot of cities. Progress can mean the disappearance of places that allow young people to get together and think critically about important or taboo topics. Society needs those kinds of places.

The gift of singing

My son will be 6 soon. My husband and I try to bring that punk ethos into our parenting. We try to be conscientious about what he's learning and school, and trying to balance some of it with our own beliefs. We spend a lot of time on learning to care for others, and why that's important.

I have a bachelor's degree in music. I studied classical — there were parallels between punk and opera. They're both dramatic and emotional, and there's a lot of volume.

I always wanted to do a job I had an emotional investment in, and my husband suggested teaching singing. Miraculously, there was a job opening at Swallow Hill, and I had to learn a lot of folk music, but it's been wonderful.

I've always loved being on stage, and I have a natural gift for singing, and I'm so thankful I get to share it.

If you have suggestions for My Name Is, please contact David Gilbert at dgilbert@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

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