My Name Is... Jessica Boyd

Domestic abuse survivor says society must address issue

David Gilbert
dgilbert@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 3/2/20

Knowing the signs I'm working on a book, and I've even got some speaking engagements. I want to show how to reduce domestic violence. With education and awareness, domestic violence can be prevented …

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My Name Is... Jessica Boyd

Domestic abuse survivor says society must address issue

Posted

Knowing the signs

I'm working on a book, and I've even got some speaking engagements. I want to show how to reduce domestic violence.

With education and awareness, domestic violence can be prevented and avoided. It's about knowing warning signs and red flags. It can be subtle, and it usually starts off slow.

The vast majority of domestic abusers are men, although it's underreported among men and women. Everyone, men and women, has work to do. It's important children don't grow up in that environment around that behavior so they don't carry it into the next generation.

Anger is just a symptom

I thought domestic violence was an anger issue, but anger is just a symptom. Anger management classes don't cut it. It's a mindset issue. It's ingrained in our culture. In the United States, it only became illegal to beat your wife in 1920.

I'm raising my son to be open and communicative, and to be aware of how his actions impact those around him.

Last week in a leadership class I'm taking, I shared some of my own experiences with domestic abuse, and afterward I was approached by both men and women. The men said just hearing my experience made them think about their actions and how they treat their partners.

I had no idea. I thought I'd only be speaking to fellow women, but it turns out men need that awareness as well.

Spreading the word

My goal is to spread the word that abuse isn't always what we think it is. It's not always a black eye or a bloody nose. It's on so many levels: physical, verbal, emotional, psychological, spiritual and sexual. I want people to get out before you get in too deep.

It's a public safety issue, and a human rights issue. It's been a long journey for women to become equal, and there are still struggles.

If you have suggestions for My Name Is, please contact David Gilbert at dgilbert@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

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