My Name Is... Andrea Manion

Accountant with a personal perspective on racism and love

Posted 7/22/19

Accounting on it Describing yourself is hard for an accountant. People don’t want to talk about numbers and taxes. I got into it accidentally. I was going to school for computer programming, and I …

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My Name Is... Andrea Manion

Accountant with a personal perspective on racism and love

Posted

Accounting on it

Describing yourself is hard for an accountant. People don’t want to talk about numbers and taxes.

I got into it accidentally. I was going to school for computer programming, and I was working for a wristwatch wholesaler. They sold watches, bands, batteries and so on.

The owner wanted to set up an online store — this was the early 2000s — and I set up the whole website. I had to learn Quickbooks, and how to calculate sales tax.

Accounting has taught me so much about what small businesses deal with. I love helping entrepreneurs make their dreams work. I love the relationships — small business owners are inspiring. You get to watch them go from struggle to success.

I’m a native, and Denver is growing like crazy, which is good for my business. Everybody needs their taxes done.

Remembering Pearl Harbor

We visit my family a lot. My grandmother, who’s 93, still lives on her own. My mom’s side of the family is Japanese. My grandpa had a farm in Englewood, and they were here at the start of WWII.

On the day of the Pearl Harbor attack, they were at the Gothic Theater watching a movie. When they got out, they hadn’t heard what happened, but everyone was staring at them.

Some people treated them badly, but mainly people in Englewood protected them. They were scared, because it wasn’t long after that that the government built a concentration camp for Japanese people in southeast Colorado. They had to deal with judgment, even though they were Colorado natives.

I try to be really open-minded with everyone, regardless of their background or race. Everyone deserves a chance to be accepted.

Good habits

I became a mom for the first time last year. It’s wonderful. I’m more responsible. Being a mother, the things I say and my actions feel more important now. It’s helped me get over bad habits.

Before we had our son, we would just eat dinner while watching TV. Now we sit down to dinner and talk about our day. We’re trying to instill good habits now, so our son never knows any different.

If you have suggestions for My Name Is, please contact David Gilbert at dgilbert@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

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