Meeting the royalty of the air

David Gilbert
dgilbert@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 2/24/20

The royalty of the air made a visit to South Platte Park on Feb. 22, as Nature's Educators introduced birds of prey to an eager audience. The Sedalia-based nonprofit showed off some of the birds …

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Meeting the royalty of the air

Posted

The royalty of the air made a visit to South Platte Park on Feb. 22, as Nature's Educators introduced birds of prey to an eager audience.

The Sedalia-based nonprofit showed off some of the birds they've rescued: a saw whet owl, a kestrel, a Swainson's hawk and a golden eagle.

Many of the group's birds are rescued after being hit and injured by cars. Volunteer Shauni Schermerhorn said people can help cut down the number by not littering along highways — including biodegradable items like apples cores and orange peels, which can draw mice, which draw birds closer to the road.

She said another common threat to the majestic birds is rat poison, which the birds ingest by eating mice and rats.

“If we create a habitat that's safe for the birds, they'll do the work of eating the mice and rats for us,” Schermerhorn said.

Meeting the birds was a thrill to Mia LeVier, 9, who offered up a few bird facts herself throughout the talk.

Asked what she wants to be when she grows up, LeVier said, “Either a zookeeper, a marine biologist, a veterinarian or a pet store owner.”

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