Jayne Davicsin loved surfing, roller coasters

Posted 2/18/19

Jayne Davicsin was 25 when she died, but to her stepdad Frank Costello, she'll always be a little girl. Davicsin was killed in the early hours of Feb. 6 when a woman fleeing police crashed into a car …

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Jayne Davicsin loved surfing, roller coasters

Posted

Jayne Davicsin was 25 when she died, but to her stepdad Frank Costello, she'll always be a little girl.

Davicsin was killed in the early hours of Feb. 6 when a woman fleeing police crashed into a car driven by Ryan Carter, whom Davicsin had recently begun dating. Carter was also killed in the wreck.

“As far as I'm concerned, she'll always be 10,” Costello said from his Littleton home. “She never just entered a room — it was like she came in banging a bass drum and cymbals and blowing a kazoo.”

Davicsin was raised in New Jersey, and enjoyed the exciting side of life.

“She grew up surfing,” Costello said. “Her grandfather taught her. She was in judo — she was a pretty girl who could roll with the best of them. She loved roller coasters, too — she went every chance she got. She rode every ride.”

Davicsin came into Costello's life when she was just 5 years old, and she was skeptical of her new stepdad at first.

“She was just a tiny little thing, but she was measuring me up,” Costello said. “I'll never forget the day I first gained her trust. I took her to the supermarket, and we had to cross the street. At the corner, I looked down and put my hand out, and she looked me up and down, and put her hand in mine. We crossed the street holding hands, and from then on we were bonded.”

Davicsin loved animals, Costello said, and adored toting around her blind, deaf pug named Daisy.

Davicsin moved to Colorado in her senior year in high school, and got a cosmetology degree at Emily Griffith High School. Davicsin's mother still lives on the East Coast.

Davicsin was a skilled cosmetologist, Costello said, and drew rave reviews from her clients at Sport Clips. She was an expert cake decorator too, he said.

Davicsin was excited about her new relationship with Carter, but hadn't yet brought her boyfriend over to meet her stepdad.

“For the last month or so, there was a lot of talk about Ryan,” Costello said. “But I'm a typical papa bear. I wasn't always so nice to her boyfriends. She was a pretty girl, you know?”

Costello said some of Davicsin's ashes will be scattered on the New Jersey seashore where she used to ride the waves.

For his family, Costello said, “it's time to heal.”

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