Colorado Parks and Wildlife modifies entrance fees, adds hangtag pass option

New structure to help agency address operating costs, staffing needs, property maintenance

Staff report
Posted 12/21/18

Colorado Parks and Wildlife will modify its state parks entrance fees beginning Jan. 1, as a result of the passage of Senate Bill 18-143 in May 2018. This is the first increase to park entry fees …

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Colorado Parks and Wildlife modifies entrance fees, adds hangtag pass option

New structure to help agency address operating costs, staffing needs, property maintenance

Posted

Colorado Parks and Wildlife will modify its state parks entrance fees beginning Jan. 1, as a result of the passage of Senate Bill 18-143 in May 2018.

This is the first increase to park entry fees since 2010.

Based on visitor feedback, the agency also will offer a hangtag park pass tied to an individual instead of a vehicle.

The revised fee structure, approved by the Parks and Wildlife Commission, allows the agency to address increased operating costs, provide adequate staffing, and fulfill property maintenance needs to continue providing programs and services while managing an increasing number of park users, according to a news release. Ten key goals have been identified for the agency as a result of this increased funding.

“The additional fees will serve to enhance all aspects of the visitor experience in Colorado’s 41 state parks,” Margaret Taylor, parks and wildlife assistant director for capital, parks and trails, said in the release. “Through funding larger capital projects to smaller on-the-ground programs, these dollars help us better serve both the public and our resources.”

Effective Jan. 1, the park entrance fee will be $8 to $10 per vehicle, and $4 for individual entering designated parks without a vehicle. The annual affixed vehicle pass costs $80, and an annual affixed multiple vehicle pass will cost $40 per vehicle. A replacement cost of $5 will apply for affixed vehicle replacement passes. The Aspen Leaf annual pass for those ages 64 and older will cost $70, with the multiple pass costing $35 per vehicle.

The state parks annual hangtag pass will cost $120. Hangtag passes are issued to individuals, not vehicles, and only one vehicle at a time can use a hangtag pass. The replacement cost for the hangtag pass will be $60.

An off-leash dog day pass will cost $3, while an off-leash annual pass is $25.

The price of the Columbine and Centennial annual passes will emain $14 prr pass, and commercial daily pass costs also remain unchanged.

“We’re very happy that in 2019 we can address the request from our visitors for a hangtag pass. This is a great option for multi-car families or those who use different vehicles for different activities,” Taylor in the release. “We’ve also added 13 parks to our individual daily pass, or `walk-in’ pass, program to help us engage more of our visitors into funding and conservation efforts.”

All annual passes, including the hangtag pass, will include a separate product panel that qualifies as an individual daily pass for designated parks.

State parks in Colorado have experienced record-breaking visitation, with nearly 15 million visitors last year. Since 2010, state parks have not received funding from state general tax dollars except occasional small amounts (less than 1 percent of the budget) for special projects, meaning the agency relies on park fees to make needed improvements, hire staff and begin planning for Colorado’s next state park, the release said.

View the full fee structure at http://cpw.state.co.us/aboutus/Pages/Our-Story-2019-Changes.aspx#ParkFees. Learn more about Colorado Parks and Wildlife at cpw.state.co.us.

Read about Senate Bill 18-143 at https://leg.colorado.gov/bills/sb18-143.

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