Election 2021: Carol Fey aims to be problem-solver as Littleton mayor

Council incumbent says she has track record of getting things done

Robert Tann
rtann@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 10/14/21

If you ask Carol Fey why she is best-suited to be Littleton's next mayor, she'll tell you she has a knack for getting things done. 

Fey, a 34-year Littleton resident who has served for four years on the city council representing District 3, has hosted in-person and virtual citizen meetings several times throughout the last four years to hear from and inform residents about the city's needs.

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Election 2021: Carol Fey aims to be problem-solver as Littleton mayor

Council incumbent says she has track record of getting things done

Posted

If you ask Carol Fey why she is best-suited to be Littleton's next mayor, she'll tell you she has a knack for getting things done. 

Fey, a 34-year Littleton resident who has served for four years on the city council representing District 3, has hosted in-person and virtual citizen meetings several times throughout the last four years to hear from and inform residents about the city's needs.

“The purpose is always information — 10 or so hot topics in Littleton — and having fun as a group,” Fey wrote in an email response to Colorado Community Media. All of Fey's responses to interview questions were sent via email. 

Now she is seeking to reach even more concerned community members by representing the city as a whole. This is the first election in years in which Littleton residents will directly elect their next mayor, as opposed to the position being voted on by councilmembers as it has in the past. 

The council incumbent said she has a track record of delivering for residents. She pointed to “hundreds of potholes filled” throughout the city as a tangible sign of her ability to improve community members' daily lives. 

She also championed her commitment to making sure her constituents are heard. One such example, Fey said, was the lack of community input that was allowed during the construction of Vita Littleton, formally known as The Grove, several years ago. 

The 159-unit senior living complex was approved by the city's planning and building departments as a use-by-right development, meaning it did not require public comment, review by the city's planning commission or approval by city council in order to move forward. 

Fey said residents were concerned about how the building would change the neighborhood on the east side of downtown Littleton and felt frustrated that they weren't able to appeal the development. 

“Once I became a city council member, I worked with city management to write an ordinance which gives citizens owning property within 700 (feet) of such a proposal the right of appeal,” she wrote. “Council passed that ordinance, and it applies to proposals going forward.”

Fey said if elected mayor, she wants to make government, and specifically city council, easier to understand for citizens.

“For example, the city is responsible for sewers, streets, zoning, code enforcement and police, and only within the city limits of Littleton.  The city has no control over schools, parks, or planes,” she wrote. 

She said she has experience making information easy to understand as she previously worked for Honeywell, an aerospace company that provides physical parts and technology to aviation businesses, space corporations and defense agencies. 

 “For example, I published a series of books making electricity easy for (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) technicians to understand,” she wrote. “Likewise, I can make the city budget and city easily understandable.  As for working together, I have a lot of experience at facilitating groups.  At Honeywell, I could bring together an arrogant corporate executive and an angry plumber customer together, and soon have everyone happy.” 

Fey said her career as a sales manager for Honeywell made her attuned to customer service.

“In Littleton, the citizen is the customer,” she wrote. “It goes like this: Listen to what the customer needs. Clarify the problem, ask questions and give clear information. If something needs to be fixed (potholes), get 'em fixed fast.  Check back to see if the customer (or) citizen is happy with the fix.  Finally, if there's more to be done, then do it."

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