Big trucks and big thanks in Highlands Ranch and Littleton

Fire trucks, muscle cars parade in gratitude to first responders

David Gilbert
dgilbert@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 10/10/20

Older people's faces lit up with childlike glee on Oct. 4 as dozens of fire trucks and hot rods rolled through the Wind Crest senior living community in Highlands Ranch. From there, the vintage …

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Big trucks and big thanks in Highlands Ranch and Littleton

Fire trucks, muscle cars parade in gratitude to first responders

Posted

Older people's faces lit up with childlike glee on Oct. 4 as dozens of fire trucks and hot rods rolled through the Wind Crest senior living community in Highlands Ranch.

From there, the vintage trucks and muscle cars made their way past the hospitals and police stations of Highlands Ranch and Littleton, paying tribute to the first responders on the front lines through the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It's our way of saying thanks to the people who do so much to keep us safe,” said Kevin Seveeney, who heads Mile High Hook and Ladder, a group of vintage fire truck enthusiasts.

In most years, the group's big annual bash is the Fire Muster, a fire truck parade and rally in downtown Littleton. But after the pandemic put the kibosh on the event, the group looked for other ways to spread happiness.

When they came up with the first responder rally, Seveeney said numerous local car clubs jumped on board too — and may just become regular fixtures of future Fire Musters.

“This is a wonderful replacement,” said Paula Wiens, a key Fire Muster organizer for many years, as she waved from the back of a truck. “I'm just glad we were able to do something this year. We're hoping the Fire Muster will be back and better than ever next year.”

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