Seed library — check it out

Littleton feed store offers resource that may be unique in area

Posted 4/29/17

A seed library is just what it sounds like — patrons check out seeds, plant them in their garden, save some seeds from the plants they grow, and return those seeds back to the library.

A wall of envelopes full of fruit, vegetable and flower …

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Seed library — check it out

Littleton feed store offers resource that may be unique in area

Posted

A seed library is just what it sounds like — patrons check out seeds, plant them in their garden, save some seeds from the plants they grow, and return those seeds back to the library.

A wall of envelopes full of fruit, vegetable and flower seeds in Lewis & Cluck Critter Goods comprises what appears to be the only permanent seed library in the Denver area. Lewis & Cluck employee and founder of the seed library Nickolas Paullus learned about the idea while living in Manitou Springs, where the public library hosts a seed library.

“It was a great resource for the community,” Paullus said, who has spent the last 10 years working on farms or in greenhouses, honing his green thumb.

He received the blessing from his boss to start it, and began distributing seeds in January.

“It's a good way to give back to the community that everyone can benefit from,” said Lewis & Cluck owner Pete McClintock.

Most of the varieties in Lewis & Cluck's library are tolerant of drought and cold weather.

“I like the idea of truly local varietals,” Paullus said.

In conjunction with the seed library, he has begun hosting classes on how to use it.

“My mom and grandma taught me the art of seed-saving,” he said.

One benefit of local seed libraries is that the seeds come from a stock grown in the same climate where they are to be planted.

“You can get seed from a seed company, but you don't know that was grown in a super-humid place back east,” Paullus said.

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