'Makerspace' to offer do-it-yourself paradise

Communal workshop to provide tools, training, space to build with

Posted 9/7/18

Sure, this may be the do-it-yourself era, but DIY starts to feel a little silly once you start adding up the cost of buying a woodshop's worth of power tools to build a couple chairs or a shelf. …

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'Makerspace' to offer do-it-yourself paradise

Communal workshop to provide tools, training, space to build with

Posted

Sure, this may be the do-it-yourself era, but DIY starts to feel a little silly once you start adding up the cost of buying a woodshop's worth of power tools to build a couple chairs or a shelf.

That's where My Own Two Hands Makerspace, due to open in mid-September at 250 E. Dry Creek Road, comes in. My Own Two Hands will offer guests a place to work on projects big and small in a communal workshop. Here are five things to know.

Lots to work with

The shop's 6,000 square feet will be loaded with all types of tools, said Jeff Hahn, who co-owns the shop with fiancee Tristan Smith.

Guests can use everything from small hand tools, up to drill presses, table saws, lathes and routers, Hahn said.

While guests can work on a wide variety of projects, the focus is woodworking, Hahn said.

“When we studied other makerspaces around the city and the country, we found the ones that didn't do as well were those that tried to be everything to everyone,” Hahn said. “They get stretched too thin offering metalworking and automotive, for instance. We'll focus on projects for around the home.”

Pay to play

Memberships to My Own Two Hands cost $119 a month, or $99 for those who register during this month's early bird period. Single-day visits cost $25, or you can buy a block of ten for $225.

Anyone who wants to use the shop will first need to complete a one- to two-hour safety course, Hahn said, and get a certification that will stay good for three years. The class costs $49 a la carte, but is free for annual members.

Additional fees apply to use high-end specialty tools or to use the on-site storage.

Helping hands

OK, you've taken your safety class, and you're standing there with an armload of lumber — now what?

My Own Two Hands will have a full-time on-site staff of experts to help plan projects and give advice, Hahn said.

“We want DIY to be accessible to everyone,” Hahn said. “So you saw this table on Pinterest, but can't figure out what to do? We'll get you there.”

Hahn said his staff is drawn from places like Red Rocks Community College's woodworking program.

Classy joint

My Own Two Hands plans to offer a slew of classes, including skills workshops, some focused on specific projects, and some on demand.

“You can set up to have a whole group come down, and everyone will leave with a pet bed, for instance,” Hahn said. “We'll also do some date night sort of classes, where boyfriends and girlfriends will each make one of a pair of salt and pepper shakers, for instance.”

Kids' stuff

Though the minimum age to work independently in the shop is 18, Hahn hopes to connect youngsters with the joy of creation.

“We're hoping to establish partnerships with the schools, since woodshops in schools have faded in recent years,” Hahn said. “We also want to work with scout groups and host birthday parties.”

“There's such pride in making something yourself,” Hahn said. “Everyone should get to experience that.”

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