Littleton High School teens exhibit at Depot Art Gallery

Students create artworks in 2 and 3 dimensions

Posted 3/6/18

Young artists need to not only learn techniques, but presentation and basic steps towards organizing an art exhibit and publicizing it. Littleton High School’s Jennifer Jeanelle has 32 students — …

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Littleton High School teens exhibit at Depot Art Gallery

Students create artworks in 2 and 3 dimensions

Posted

Young artists need to not only learn techniques, but presentation and basic steps towards organizing an art exhibit and publicizing it. Littleton High School’s Jennifer Jeanelle has 32 students — “the most ever” — enrolled in her advanced afternoon class, which will exhibit works through March 18 at the Depot Art Gallery, 2069 West Powers Ave., Littleton.

This gallery is in a repurposed Santa Fe Railroad depot from the 1890s, which once connected Littleton with the rest of the country, delivering items from Sears, etc., as well as transporting commuters into Denver — and daily cans of milk from the creameries. (Numerous dairy farms dotted the south-area landscape in Douglas and Arapahoe counties.)

Students have created varied pieces of artwork in two and three dimensions and figured out how to best display them with a title — and sometimes commentary about the process. They will gather at a community reception from 4 to 6 p.m. on March 14 to meet with parents, teachers, school board members and neighbors to talk about their art and how it came to be.

Artists include International Baccalaureate students Maleia Holyfield, Charlie Meserve, Evalynn Pirnack, Ethan Schwarz and Devany Shikiar. Studio students who meet at the same time and place are Danyah Al Saaid, Indica Barnett, Michael Brooks, Holley Brown, Grace Crabb, Jacques Goffinet, Alex Green, Eva Greenwalt, Katie Hill, Carien Hoogwater, Colleen Huynh, Kate Kacerovskis, Alana Kroeker, Kyle Orcholski, Grace Reichardt, Sydney Reynolds, Ruby Schroder, Layla Segismundo, Barrett Small, Gabe Talbert, Cooper Weins and Leslie Williams.

They are juniors and seniors. The IB students meet a specific portfolio and testing process required by their program, which is offered at Littleton High in most upper level academic subjects. All of these students keep a journal/sketchbook with yearlong entries and sketches, as well as commentary on experiences outside the school.

Jeanelle began class the day we visited with a “debriefing” about a museum visit to a faculty show at the University of Denver. What did the students take away? “It was fun — the viewer could develop their own perspective” … It had a particular focus on the process each participating artist followed and was described as “focused/specific” for each artist. Jeanelle responded that the exhibits were “An inch wide and a mile deep,” in contrast to students’ widespread approach to a project. “This is what you should be documenting in your sketchbooks,” she reminded them.

Students had some finished pieces of art but weren’t certain if they would exhibit them as their instructor encouraged them to focus. Sydney Reynolds had completed a piece she called “Resurrection,’ using a black dog skeleton left over from Halloween, decorated with flowers and wire. It reflected thoughts about relatives who had died, she said. Holley Brown, who is interested in theatrical costuming, had created a decorative lion mask, other headdresses and a lovely princess dress in satin, with flowers. Danyah Al Said had a finished drawing called “Do,” created “with Sharpies mostly.” Maleia Holyfield was working on a three-minute video, “Mine,” built around a song and using photos of friends and family, she said. “Music is a prominent presence in my life.”

Art teacher Jeanelle is active in the Denver metro arts community and exhibits her work in the area. Several years ago, she had a floor-to-ceiling installation at the Arvada Center. “I’ve been so busy, I may just do an installation at my home this year,” she said as she returned to working with individual students to help with organizing the upcoming exhibit.

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