Letter to the editor: The public will pay for it

Posted 1/11/18

Regarding Congressman Coffman's guest column on "net neutrality" in last week's paper:

While it is admirable that Coffman called for a delay of the vote in December, which went through anyway, I …

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Letter to the editor: The public will pay for it

Posted

Regarding Congressman Coffman's guest column on "net neutrality" in last week's paper:

While it is admirable that Coffman called for a delay of the vote in December, which went through anyway, I hope the congressman comes to realize that all the arguments for the last few years that have tried to state net neutrality is an antiquated pariah, similar to the phone line system of 70 years ago, are specious at best.  

That existing phone line system was fair and equitable for all. The rate of speed was the same for everyone, from individuals to corporations, as has been the internet ever since it was made available for public use. Now, if that vote of the FCC remains unchanged, internet providers will charge whatever they want, and will be able to slow down, or speed up, for use of the internet.

Any websites you use, that is provided by a provider who may not like that website, will not only be able to slow it down, but could speed it up and charge for it - and guess who ultimately will pay for the increased cost? We will - the public. 

Kenneth Valero

Littleton

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