Former LPS teacher sentenced for sex crimes

Crimes occurred years ago; victim came forward last year

Posted 10/9/17

A former Littleton Public Schools teacher was sentenced on Oct. 6 to four years in prison, three years of probation and a lifetime on the sex offender registry after pleading guilty to sexually assaulting one of his students.

A former student …

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Former LPS teacher sentenced for sex crimes

Crimes occurred years ago; victim came forward last year

Posted

A former Littleton Public Schools teacher was sentenced on Oct. 6 to four years in prison, three years of probation and a lifetime on the sex offender registry after pleading guilty to sexually assaulting one of his students.

A former student last year accused Michael Camelio, 70, of sexually assaulting her while she was a student at Newton Middle School in Centennial. The accuser, who was 36 when she came forward last year, said the assaults continued for five years and occurred on school property, continuing after she went to high school and Camelio had transferred to nearby Powell Middle School.

Camelio, who lives in Highlands Ranch, pleaded guilty on July 31 to sex assault on a child by a person in a position of trust, a class 4 felony.

Camelio “stole my adolescence,” the accuser said in a statement read in court. “I lived with a continuous secret of what was happening to me. It took me years to identify what it was: sexual abuse. I knew I could not heal until I spoke the truth.”

The age of the case meant that only the later assaults could be charged, according to a press release.

“These cases are some of the most difficult we prosecute,” 18th Judicial District Attorney George Brauchler said in a news release. “As parents, we entrust teachers with what is most precious to us. The defendant betrayed that trust, victimized a young girl and left her to deal with the trauma for the rest of her life. I applaud her for having the courage to come forward and seek justice, and I encourage those in similar situations to do the same.”

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