Littleton

Eagle Scout seeks fame for bloomtown

Teen thinks crabapple trees may set record

Posted 4/18/14

Eagle Scout Cole Hancock needs everyone's help to get Littleton into the record books as the city with the most crabapple trees per capita.

“Why not?” he asks. “We checked, and as best we can tell, no one else has claimed the record. So we …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.
Littleton

Eagle Scout seeks fame for bloomtown

Teen thinks crabapple trees may set record

Posted

Eagle Scout Cole Hancock needs everyone's help to get Littleton into the record books as the city with the most crabapple trees per capita.

“Why not?” he asks. “We checked, and as best we can tell, no one else has claimed the record. So we decided to count them and make an application.”

To help, go into your back yard and count all the crabapple trees that aren't visible from the street, then send your address and the number to littletoncrabappletrail@gmail.com or to Littleton Crabapple Trail Inc., PO Box 110, Littleton, CO 80160.

Hancock will head up the effort to get the rest of them counted and submit an application to Guinness World Records.

“Who knows? Maybe we can claim the record, and it will be up to some other city to do their own count and beat us if they can,” he said.

Hancock, 15, has been tending to the trees since 2011, when he took on the cause for his Eagle Scout project. That's the same year signs went up marking the city's Crabapple Route, conceived of by former Mayor Vaughn Gardinier. It was his idea 45 years ago to line Littleton's streets with the hardy, colorful crabapple trees not just to make them pretty, but to give the city something unique.

“Forty years later, people see all those trees and think, `That's kind of cool. Whoever thought of that?'” said Larry Borger, president of Littleton Crabapple Trail Inc. “Vaughn was the crabapple guy. Sometimes people would say, `Gardinier … they make a mess all over.' He always had a running battle with the city.”

Gardinier died in 2012, but his wife, Mary, still sits on the board of LCTI. She says he was hoping to arrange for horse-drawn carriages to someday trot the trail.

On April 19, Hancock and others from Littleton Boy Scout Troop 361 were set to plant about 30 more trees along the seven-mile Crabapple Route, adding to the 100 they've planted since 2011. Borger estimates there is a total of 1,500 to 2,000 existing trees in the city all told. These days, LCTI plants trees that flower but don't bear fruit, making for a less messy flourish of beauty each spring.

For more information and to see a map of the trail, visit www.littletoncrabappletrail.org.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.