Coming Attractions

Arvada Center explores dark side of American Dream

Recommended activities for the coming week

Posted 3/6/18

There are certain expectations that come with seeing an Arthur Miller show — it’s going to be intense, heady and dramatic. His 1947 masterpiece “All My Sons” certainly fits the bill. It’s …

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Coming Attractions

Arvada Center explores dark side of American Dream

Recommended activities for the coming week

Posted

There are certain expectations that come with seeing an Arthur Miller show — it’s going to be intense, heady and dramatic. His 1947 masterpiece “All My Sons” certainly fits the bill. It’s the story of a manufacturer who sold faulty parts to the U.S. military during World War II, and the unforeseen impacts on his family and those he loves.

“It’s the story of a family that is stuck, and can’t come to terms with their past,” said Emma Messenger, one of the leads in the Arvada Center’s production of the show. “When you can’t face certain losses, it’s difficult to move forward.”

“All My Sons” runs at the Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., through May 3. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. on Thursdays through Saturdays, 1 p.m. on Wednesdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays.

Not only does the show examine the bonds of family, but it also delves into wartime struggle, personal responsibility and the illusions of the American Dream.

“It’s so beautifully written that it fell completely natural playing these characters,” said Sam Gregory, who plays Joe Keller, husband to Messenger’s Kate. “It speaks to the core of what makes us Americans, and I think that’s what makes it speak to everyone.”

“All My Sons” is the third and final entry in the Center’s Black Box Repertory Company Season, which includes “Sense and Sensibility” and “The Electric Baby,” both of which are still running.

“The show really looks at what happens when people isolate themselves to the point where they’re only focused on their own families,” Messenger said. “If one focuses on their one small tribe, the world becomes smaller and smaller. You can be trapped in your own backyard.”

To purchase tickets, call 720-898-7200 or go to www.arvadacenter.org/all-my-sons.

On WWI and Wonder Woman

This November will mark 100 years since the first World War — the War to End All Wars — ended. Understandably, this milestone is giving museums and historians the world over an opportunity to examine the lessons learned and ignored from the conflict.

The Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, is hosting WWI: Longmont and the Great War, through May about the war that includes full infantry uniforms, artifacts relating to medical care during the war, an airplane propeller, propaganda posters, photographs, letters and diaries, and many other personal objects. The exhibition also features a two-thirds scale biplane — a locally made Curtiss JN-4 “Jenny” replica of the planes used by U.S. Army pilots in training during the war.

In addition to the exhibit, there’s a film series, Views and Brews, that includes signature drinks, wine and beers. And at 7:15 p.m. on Thursday, March 8, the series will be featuring last year’s titanic blockbuster, “Wonder Woman.”

For more information on the exhibit and film series, call 303-651-8374 or visit www.longmontcolorado.gov/departments/departments-e-m/museum.

Treasures await from world over

For 43 years, The World Wide Antique and Vintage Show, has been an opportunity for collectors of all experience levels to discover hard to find and much sought-after treasures.

This year’s The World Wide Antique and Vintage Show will be at The Denver Mart, 451 E. 58th Ave. in Denver, from March 9 through 11. The show is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday.

The show features between 85 to 100 antique and vintage dealers from around the United States. Dealers travel the globe to find new and interesting items to bring to the show and shoppers in Denver.

The entry fee for the show is $5 per person, which allows entry for all three days. Children 12 and younger are free.

Get information and tickets at www.findyourantique.com.

An ancient tradition made new

The art of using shadows to tell stories goes back thousands of generations — an art form taken to new levels by Catapult.

The dance group performed on season eight America’s Got Talent, and features eight dancers, a drop, a few lights and a choreographer. The avant-garde show blends dance, music, and the contrast of light and darkness to create stories exploring a variety of themes and subjects.

Check out Catapult at Parker’s PACE Center, 20000 Pikes Peak Ave., at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 10.

For tickets, head to www.parkerarts.org.

Clarke’s Concert of the Week — Glen Hansard at Boulder Theater

Irish singer-songwriter Glen Hansard has been making music for most of his life, and while he first rose to prominence as a member of The Frames, it was his collaboration with Czech musician Markéta Irglová as the Swell Season that made him a name to know.

Together the pair worked on the film “Once,” and took home the Academy Award for Best Original Song for “Falling Slowly” from the film. In 2013, the Broadway adaptation, “Once, The Musical,” won eight Tony Awards including the top musical prize itself.

Since then, he’s gone his own way, releasing three solo albums — the third of which, “Between Two Shores,” was released on Jan. 19 of this year. It’s full of the quietly lovely jazz-influenced folk that he’s perfected over his career. Tracks like “Why Woman” and “Lucky Man” are two of the best love songs of the year, and the album as a whole overflows with warmth and intimacy.

So, audiences will be lucky to spend an evening with Glen Hansard at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, March 14 at the Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St.

For more information, and to get your tickets, visit www.bouldertheater.com.

Clarke Reader’s column on culture appears on a weekly basis. A community editor with Colorado Community Media, he can be reached creader@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

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