Academy participants learn to save lives

Posted 11/13/17

They've got tourniquets and they know how to use them.

More than two dozen attendees of the Littleton Police Department's Citizens' Academy wrapped up their final class learning how to apply tourniquets to bleeding wounds, as part of a Department …

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Academy participants learn to save lives

Posted

They've got tourniquets and they know how to use them.

More than two dozen attendees of the Littleton Police Department's Citizens' Academy wrapped up their final class learning how to apply tourniquets to bleeding wounds, as part of a Department of Homeland Security program called Stop the Bleed, which aims to train ordinary citizens how to respond to traumatic injuries before emergency personnel arrive.

“Given recent events, such as the shootings in Las Vegas, Texas, or even the Walmart in Thornton, the next progression for our profession is looking at how to equip the community to deal with these types of casualties,” Littleton Police Chief Doug Stephens said.

The Citizens' Academy is a free 10-week course held twice a year by the Littleton Police Department that introduces civilians to various aspects of police procedures, from investigation techniques to firearm and K-9 demonstrations.

Students practiced applying tourniquets to the arms of firefighters and Stephens, and found that a properly applied tourniquet needs to be cranked pretty tight. Each student received a military-grade tourniquet to take home.

“Las Vegas highlighted that the community can treat the community,” Stephens said. “If they can take simple steps to save lives, we're excited to teach them that.”

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