Third-graders strut their reading stuff

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Littleton Public Schools third-graders outpaced the state average on this year’s Transitional Colorado Assessment Program reading test by 13 percentage points.

“We are very proud that our third-grade reading scores continue to be so high,” said Scott Murphy, LPS superintendent. “These scores are a clear reflection of the dedication our students, parents, teachers and principals have to helping each student achieve at a high level. We are always looking to improve, and these tests help us pinpoint areas that need more attention.”

This is the second year the TCAP has been administered since it replaced the Colorado Student Assessment Program, or CSAP. It’s bridging the gap until new state standards are fully established.

Eighty-six percent of all LPS third-graders scored proficient or advanced on this year’s test, compared with 73 percent at the state level. Gains were made in six of the 15 schools.

“LPS has initiated a strong focus on literacy at the elementary level,” reads a press release accompanying the scores. “The five elementary schools serving students with the greatest needs have had five years of intensive literacy training and intervention; other elementary schools have had a literacy focus for three or four years. As a result, overall LPS third-grade reading scores have steadily increased or remained very high.”

Five elementary schools have more than 90 percent of kids reading at a proficient or above: Littleton Academy charter school (98), Franklin (96), Wilder (95), Lenski (94) and Sandburg (92).

Coming in at less than the state average number of proficient and above readers are East (68) and Field (62).

Building on last year’s 7 percent increase in the number of students with disabilities who scored proficient and advanced, this year showed an additional 3 percent increase for a total of 10 percent over two years. English-language learners performed better overall this year than last.